Ida Mae Rhodes

Ida Mae Rhodes was born in 1899 and lived until 2000 – 101 years. She went to the University of Cincinnati; most records show her graduating in 1919. Yet the university bulletin for 1919-1920 shows her as a junior, and in 1920 she became the president of the first African American sorority on the campus.[…]

Lawrence C. Hawkins, Ph. D.

Lawrence Hawkins was born in South Carolina in 1919, the son of a sharecropper. His family moved to Cincinnati in 1926, and he enrolled in Frederick Douglass School, the African American school in Walnut Hills. One biographical sketch notes “It was there he received a strong foundation which carried him through Walnut Hills High School[…]

Eleanora Alms and her legacy

Eleanora Alms survived her husband Frederick by more than 20 years. She stepped in to the role of a leading philanthropist, lavishly memorializing her late husband, but also imprinting her own cultural tastes for art and design on the city of Cincinnati. As mentioned in the previous post, in 1902 Eleanora Alms donated the enormous[…]

Dr. Lucy Oxley

Dr. Lucy Oxley, the first African American woman to earn an MD from the University of Cincinnati medical school (1935), ran her practice in Walnut Hills. She helped to found what became the Academy of Family Physicians in 1947-48 and served on the Ohio State Board of Medical Examiners beginning in 1980, and was named[…]

Jennie Davis Porter

Jennie Davis Porter was born in 1876, the daughter of a school teacher and a former slave said to be Cincinnati’s first African American undertaker. She attended the city’s integrated schools, and graduated from Hughes High School in 1893. In 1897 she began to teach at Fredrick Douglass school, at the time the only African[…]