The Great Migration

In the nineteenth century, both before and after the Civil War, most African Americans lived in the rural South. Cincinnati had a relatively high African American population for a Northern city at about 5% in the early twentieth century, and the population grew by nearly a third in the first decade of that century to[…]

Grace Smith Slade

James and Mary Smith lived in the African American settlement near the Elm Street Colored School, on Maple Street (later 2912 Park Avenue). They were within a few blocks of Dangerfield Earley’s home. In 1875 their daughter Grace was born, the second of five children in a home that “maintained the ideals of culture and[…]

Black History Month Project 2018: Frederick Douglass School

The Walnut Hills Historical Society has prepared a picture and a short caption for each day of the month to appear in Frederick Douglass School. Spencer School, also in Walnut Hills, is also sharing with their students. We’re putting on our Facebook Page. We’ll post them here, too. Check back each day until the end[…]

Cincinnati Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs

African American Cincinnatians fared better than their sisters and brothers in the South during the years of Jim Crow beginning in the 1880’s, but even in this northern city they suffered tremendous radical prejudice and found themselves excluded from social services extended to the white population. African American women often took the lead in programs[…]